Criminal Justice

The Criminal Justice Program offers students an interdisciplinary degree experience designed to provide them with the skills and knowledge necessary for a career in criminal justice or advanced studies. The program provides an understanding of the justice system, its functions, problems, and cultural impacts, as well as an understanding of the forces that impact crime and deviance.

Students can major or minor in criminal justice.

Students majoring in Criminal Justice are required to complete courses related to crime, policing, corrections, criminal justice, criminal law, and juvenile justice. They are also required to take courses in political science, sociology, psychology, and philosophy. Students are encouraged to take criminal justice electives on topics such as social problems, drugs and crime, forensic anthropology, and family violence.

Students who minor in criminal justice are required to take 15 hours of criminal justice and sociology courses. This plan of study complements the educational pursuits of students in many different majors. This program provides a general overview of the criminal and juvenile justice systems and an understanding of the cultural and environmental factors that impact crime.

Internships

Students who major in criminal justice are required to complete an internship or independent study course to fulfill the cross-cultural experiential requirement. Most students choose an internship. Students have interned with numerous local and state police agencies, correctional agencies, juvenile justice institutions, day report centers, probation and parole agencies, law firms, and courts.

After Graduation

Students who graduate with a degree in criminal justice are prepared for many unique employment opportunities. Graduates are eligible for careers in: law enforcement, community and institutional corrections, victim-based programs, probation and parole, and juvenile justice programs among others.

Our program also prepares graduates for further education in the areas of criminal justice, criminology, sociology, and law school.